Martineau Gardens

Half term is here and whilst we’re both feeling shattered the kids are climbing the walls with cabin fever. We had a quick look on the web for places to visit near Birmingham but most of them we’ve done to death and then we noticed the Martineau Gardens.

I’d heard of the gardens through work as a couple of years ago the head gardener came out to talk to our students about working as a gardener. He brought some wonderful pictures and plants and I thought it’d be a great place to visit and then I just forgot about it.

The gardens are very easy to get to, just opposite the Priory Hospital on the Priory Road down from the cricket ground in Edgebaston.

We got out of the car and were greeted by the lovely Meredith Andrea, a local poet and publisher who volunteers at the gardens. Meredith showed us around and made us all feel very welcome. The. Gardens are wonderful, even in Autumn, especially the eucalyptus trees with their peeling camouflaged bark. The hot house smelt incredible, in a good way, but I’m not sure what of and the wild area was great for the kids to explore.

As well as a whole host of exotic and more common plants and fauna there’s a huge fire pit and a clay oven where local produce has been cooked and consumed. Next to this is a large play house made from wood and clay, or possibly dung and next to that a large stage in the shape of a boat called the African Queen but no sign of Humphrey Bogart.

We all thought it was an incredible place to visit and can’t wait to see it in the Spring and Summer. In fact we’re not waiting as we’re going back on Wednesday for Halloween stories around the fire!

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3 thoughts on “Martineau Gardens

  1. December greetings to you! Just wanted to get in touch and say how much we’ve enjoyed reading your review of Martineau Gardens (posted in October but we only found it today) – a pleasure to discover it on this wet and rainy day and think back on warmer days.

  2. Pingback: Midsummer Poetry Picnic. | Here come the lobsters!

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